Are you a bad boss if you don’t let your staff watch the football?

17 Jun
by Donna Obstfeld, posted in Blog   |  No Comments

Today’s blog has been inspired by my brief interview yesterday afternoon on BBC Three Counties Radio. I thought I was going to get bumped as the devastating news that MP Jo Cox had died after being stabbed and shot was coming through, but the Producer decided she wanted to finish on a more positive note and were going to briefly “fit me in.”

Photo by Yui Mok/PA Wire URN:22984252

Jo Cox, MP

So, before I start, I want to send my condolences to the family, friends and constituents of

Jo Cox, MP. My thoughts are with you all at this unbelievably difficult time.

To Football or not to Football? – That is THE question!

The reason for me being on the radio was altogether different – “Are you a bad boss if you don’t let your staff watch the football?”

Now, I could have fun with this one!

During the interview we touched on:

  • Whether all workplaces are conducive to watching a game of football
  • Should Euro 2016 be treated any differently to other events i.e. The World Cup, The Olympics, The Chelsea Flower Show etc. After all, not everyone likes football.
  • What happens if you have a multi-cultural workforce supporting different teams and does this impact on which games you ‘show’?
  • How bosses should manage an employee who ‘bunks off’ work to watch the football
  • What happens if an employee who travels to France is arrested in violent clashes

 

All workplaces are not the same

There are many working environments where stopping work and watching the football is just not possible or appropriate. Imagine the scene – a large general hospital “Hold on madam, I can’t operate on you just yet as we are watching the England vs Wales match. I’ll be with you in 2 hours”. Or a large department store in a shopping centre “Ladies and Gentlemen, due to the England vs Wales match, the store is closing in 5 minutes to allow our staff to watch the game. Please return in 2 hours, when we will be delighted to assist you with your purchases”. In some workplaces, it is never going to happen. That doesn’t make the boss a bad boss, it just means they have a business to run or patients to tend to.

Cats at workSo what about the office environments or schools where the decision is taken to watch the England game. “Why the England game?,” I hear you cry. Well that is the first issue. In a multi-cultural environment, there may be employees from across Europe who want to watch games for their home teams.

When deciding how to handle the Euro 2016 fixtures, a business needs to adopt a policy which is fair and can be applied to all workers, from all countries and those who do not want to watch the football at all – yes there are people who do not want to know and do not care!

There are multiple options and no right and wrong solutions, but the normal laws around discrimination still apply. Do not discriminate against employees based on their age, gender, race, religion, ethnicity or beliefs.

Flexible working for all employees may be a good solution – staff work a set number of hours a day and as long as they make up the hours, they can watch the football. So some may start early and leave early, others may work through lunch and stay late. Employers may choose to require the hours to be worked on the specific day or may allow flexi-working across the week.

In some businesses, where there is a requirement to keep the business operational, employers may allow employees to listen to the game rather than to watch it or insist on shifts among the team. Employees who have no interest at all may agree to cover the department while the others are watching the football – but employers need to find an appropriate way to thank and recognise those employees left holding the fort.

Other considerations for the Euro 2016 season – do you screen the game in the office and 2016_euro_cup_flags_image_lglet everyone watch together or do you send people to the local pub or even home to watch the match? This may depend on your location and on the nature of your workforce. If people are likely to get very emotional and fired up to the extent that they could be abusive or ‘out of control’, it is better not to have them on the premises. This might be the case if you have employees supporting both the teams playing.

Do you supply drinks and nibbles to keep the staff at work, create more of a team atmosphere in the office and turn it into an event? This is a nice thing to do but here are a few considerations for you:

  1. If you are serving alcohol, will employees be fit to work afterwards and / or fit to drive home. Although they are all adults, you are the employer and have a duty of care and if you have supplied the alcohol and allowed them to drive home (especially if in a company car) or operate machinery, the risk sits with you.
  2. We are in the middle of Ramadan (if you didn’t read my blog last week on the topic, you can do so here). If you have Muslim employees, you must consider them when planning your football events. The best advice I can give you is to speak to them and involve them in the planning if you are intending on serving food and drink of any sort.
  3. Which games do you supply the drinks and nibbles for? All of them, just the England games? Perhaps only the Welsh games?

Whichever approach you take, talk to your staff, involve them in the planning and don’t spend a fortune on something they don’t actually appreciate.

Bend it like Beckham

Glasses of alcoholWhat happens when employees bend the rules?
If a half day off to watch the football becomes an entire day in the pub?
If an employee wakes a little worse for wear the morning after the night before and decides to take a duvet day, but is perhaps very indiscreet about doing so, sharing across social media?
Or if an employee comes back to work having consumed huge amounts of alcohol and tells your top client what he thinks of him?

The short answer is, all your normal policies and procedures must apply. Follow your normal processes for managing unauthorised absences. Ensure you have all the facts and then present them to your employee. Ensure you provide them with adequate notice of the meeting and give them the right to be accompanied. If you are going to discipline someone, follow your normal procedures and in the absence of normal procedures, get advice.

Unable to attend work due to incarceration

In the unlikely event one of your employees finds themselves on the wrong side of the law and is arrested or detained while watching a match in France, you need to take advice. You can’t automatically fire them, but depending on the circumstances, you may be able to take disciplinary action which may be termination of contract. This however is an extreme scenario and one which hopefully no employer finds themselves in. If you do, get advice before you do anything. Do not send them a text telling them they are an idiot and you are firing them – you will end up in an employment tribunal!

 

Whatever you chose to do this football season, be consistent and communicate it in advance.

Ramadan and its potential impact on your staff, your business and you

06 Jun
by Donna Obstfeld, posted in Blog   |  No Comments

ramadanMonday 6th June is the start of Ramadan this year and it reminds me of a training session which I led 20+ years ago. It was the middle of summer and about 25 degrees out. Where almost all the delegates had bottles of water in front of them, one of the employees sat in the front row with an apple in front of him. The apple sat there all morning and all afternoon. At the end of the day I asked him what the apple was for, “Its Ramadan,” he explained, “I’m fasting.” Once he explained that, I understood it, but puzzled went on to ask him why the apple was sat there if our session ended at 4:30 in the afternoon and being Ramadan he could not eat until after dark. “It’s a reminder for me. A reminder not to eat. Eating is such a natural process and everyone around me is eating, so the Apple is a constant reminder of Ramadan and the fact that I am fasting”.

The employee was aware of his religious obligations, they didn’t impact on his ability to work or to attend training courses and they didn’t impact on anyone else on the course and that is very often the case with most employees and their religious practices (or none).

This year Ramadan continues until 5th July and because it coincides with the Summer Solstice here in the Northern Hemisphere, UK Muslims will be fasting for up to 19 hours a day this year.

So how might this impact on employers?

The biggest risk to employers, apart from tired and hungry employees is the risk of a discrimination claim. As with other forms of discrimination, if an employee feels that they are being either directly or indirectly discriminated against because of their religion (in this case being a Muslim), they would have a right to bring a claim against their employer.

So here are our Hot Tips to avoid the risk of a religious discrimination claim (and by the way, these could apply to any religion):

  1. Employers should be sensitive to the needs of Muslim employees.
    1. Perhaps avoid organising a team lunch or gala dinner during Ramadan. The same would apply with putting on a food centred event of Yom Kippur (the main Jewish fast day).
    2. Avoid compulsory overnight trips. If there is an unavoidable requirement, have an open conversation with your Muslim employee(s) and agree how best to balance  the demands of the business with the religious obligations of the employee
  2. Allow short term flexibility to enable Muslims to observe their religious obligations. Any short term arrangements should be confirmed in writing as such and clearly communicated to all employees.
    1. Speak to Muslim employees and agree what is reasonable
    2. Provide a suitable space / room for prayer during the day
    3. Being flexible with start and finish times during the working day may be beneficial to facilitate fasting. Where employees work shifts, these could be used to limit the impact of Ramadan on the business.
    4. Fasting employees may appreciate working through their lunch hour and being able to start late or finish early. This may avoid long walks to / from work in the heat or crowded commuter trains.
    5. Breaks can also be altered on a temporary basis. But it is important to ensure that all employees still take regular breaks.
  3. Create an environment in which Religious needs can be discussed openly and balanced with the requirements of the business.
  4. Managing decreased productivity and performance issues
    1. Care needs to be taken to ensure that employees whose performance drops as a result of the impact of fasting are not indirectly discriminated against because of their Religion. It doesn’t mean that you can’t take action, just that you need to be very clear that this is a prolonged performance issue and not one directly related to Ramadan.
    2. A robust investigation should take place into the drop in performance Ramadan 2and reasonable adjustments put in place before any kind of disciplinary outcome is considered.

Annual Leave for Eid

Eid – al – Fitr is at the end of Ramadan and is a holiday and celebration for many Muslims.

Hopefully all employers have a robust annual leave policy in place for managing holiday requests, however this may include how much notice must be given and the number of people out of the department at any one time.

If you have a number of Muslims employed in the business or in a particular department, advanced planning should be done to ensure that there are enough staff to cover the holiday requests. This is a religious holiday and although staff will usually be asked to take it from their normal holiday entitlement, it may still generate late requests (as the specific dates vary year on year) or multiple employee requests.

The key is planning ahead and knowing that Ramadan and Eid will happen on an annual basis. Understand how it will affect your employees and your business and work as a team to mitigate the impact.

The Employment Legislation Outlook

03 Jun
by Donna Obstfeld, posted in Blog, employent law, National Living Wage, National Minimum Wage, pay   |  No Comments

Below is a summary of planned employment legislation changes.

There are a couple of things to note:

  1. There was no statutory increase in rates in April of this year, except for Redundancy which increased by £4 per week
  2. There may be an alignment of the National Minimum Wage Increases and the National Living Wage increases as the October rate increases have been announced as being in place for 6 months to March 30th 2017
Jan – June 2016 Consultation on extension of shared parental leave and pay to working grandparents – if approved, legislation timetable to follow.
18 June 2016 Posted Workers (Enforcement of Employment Rights) Regulations 2016 expected to come into force.
July 2016 Public sector exit payments clawback regulations enforcement expected.
7 September 2016 New financial sector whistleblowing rules to be introduced.
1 October 2016 Increase in National Minimum Wage
October 2016 Gender pay gap reporting regulations coming into force (first reports due 2018).
October 2016 Earliest likely implementation date for measures in the Immigration Bill 2015-16.
April 2017 Increase in National Living Wage for over 25’s
Potential increase in National Minimum Wage
April 2017 Potential increase in Statutory rates in line with CPI
6 April 2017 Apprenticeship levy due to take effect.
30 April 2017 ‘Snapshot’ gender pay gap reporting begins for employers with 250+ employees.
September 2017 30 hours’ free childcare becomes available for 3 and 4-year olds in working families.
October 2017 Potential increase in National Minimum Wage – if not raised in April 2017
April 2018 Increase in National Living Wage for Over 25’s
April 2018 Potential increase in Statutory rates in line with CPI
30 April 2018 First gender pay gap reports to be published by organisations with 250 or more employees.

High Heels and a Noose Around the Neck

23 May
by Donna Obstfeld, posted in Agency workers, Blog, employee rights, Policies and Procedures   |  No Comments

What makes my line of work fascinating …. People!

What drives me to destruction …. People!

There is an old saying ….. “there’s none so queer as folk” and in my line of work I never cease to be amazed by what I see, what I hear and how far people (both employers and employees) are prepared to rub up against the very edges of the law.

I regularly get calls from BBC Three Counties Radio being asked to comment on an HR story which has hit the news. This has ranged from Jeremy Clarkson hitting a producer to dogs being allowed in the workplace and most recently a female employee being sent home from work because the heel of her shoe was not high enough and a butcher who advertised a vacancy but didn’t want any drama queens to apply!

Interestingly, I have now noticed that ahead of going live on air The Producer always asks BBC 3 Counties Radiome my opinion and then the presenter takes the opposite view point. Over the years I have been doing this, I know exactly how the presenter would generally respond (regardless of my view point), but once the discussion gets going he ensures we have a good debate around the issues. Some of these discussions become very interesting as we can generally both argue for the employer and the employee on both sides on any argument.

This is one of the greatest problems faced by employers, you can always see a situation from multiple perspectives and making the ‘right’ decision will depend on your business, your morals, the law, your finances, the individual themselves and the rest of your team (both internal and external). It is very rare that there is a black and white decision with no risks attached.

One recent interview focussed on an agency worker who had been assigned to work on reception in the London office of a global management consultancy company. She had been informed that a uniform would be provided on arrival and that she needed to wear black shoes with a heel of between 2 and 4 inches. She was wearing smart black flat shoes but was sent home as she was ‘inappropriately’ dressed.

Now on the one hand, an employer is absolutely entitled to have a dress code policy and enforce it; but on the other hand it must be reasonable and not expose the employer to any risks. In this case the risks are that the employee can bring a sex or disability discrimination claim:

  • A male employee would not be asked to wear a heel of between 2 and 4 inches.
  • An employee with a knee or back problem might struggle to wear a heel
  • There is no requirement of the role to wear such a heel
    • Examples of job related requirements might include:
      • the use of personal protective equipment i.e. steel capped shoes, hi-vi jackets or ear defenders
      • training shoes in a gym environment to protect the floor
      • lace up shoes for the police

TiesIn a similar scenario we dealt with recently, an estate agent had a dress code policy in which all employees were required to wear suits. For ladies this could be a trouser, skirt or dress suit, but it had to be a business suit. This was clearly stated in the dress code of the company and was in contracts of employment which every employee was given and signed before commencing work. A male employee refused to wear a tie. His manager asked him nicely and informally. His manager called him into a meeting to discuss any issues or concerns and to point out that there was a contractual obligation. The employee’s attitude was “I’m not wearing a tie and you can’t make me” – my polite interpretation and a summary of the conversation. The line manager warned the employee that they were in breach of company policy, that everyone else complied with the policy and continued failure to follow a reasonable request would lead to disciplinary procedures.

As in so many cases we see, the employee goes running off to the doctor. Now usually they come back with a fit note signing them off work for 4 weeks due to work related stress a.k.a. being asked to do something they don’t want to do or being told that they could face disciplinary action. (Don’t get me wrong, there are plenty of employers who do put their employees under incredible, unacceptable stress, but we are talking about a tie).

In this instance, the employee returned with a fit note from his doctor stating that wearing a tie gave him migraines. So what does the employer do? The doctor says the employee can’t wear a tie. Well, is it the tie which is to tight or the short collar? The employer, willing to make a ‘reasonable adjustment’ gave the employee four options:

  • Undo the top button, and then push the tie up to hide the open collar
  • Buy shirts with larger size neck sizes
  • Buy a collar extender to increase the neck size
  • Wear a clip on tie

The employee still refused. He ended up in a disciplinary meeting the outcome of which was a written warning. He is still refusing to wear his tie and the company will be taking further action.

Is a tie, or the height of the heel worth making a fuss over? Well, that depends on the nature of your business.

Is the dress code policy reasonable and appropriate to the working environment? Each employer needs to think about whether they want their staff in specific clothes or a uniform or in deed to refrain from wearing certain clothes. Every business owner needs to decide what is right for them, their business and their clients. For some businesses and organisations, it doesn’t matter at all, while for others the staff wearing branded clothes or specific colours or personal protective equipment is expected and essential and in some instances, the dress code may only apply at specific times or locations.

Whatever dress code you want to enforce, there are 4 golden rules:

  • Be clear about what is and is not allowed / required
  • Check that the policy itself is not exposing your business to the risks of discrimination claims
  • Document your policy (ideally in your contracts of employment) and ensure that it is properly communicated to remove any doubt
  • Be consistent in its application, so as not to discriminate against any group of employees

Auto Enrolment is coming….. ready or not

09 May
by Donna Obstfeld, posted in Auto enrolment, Blog, pensions   |  No Comments

Walking on moneyI know I am going on about it constantly, but I have been going on about it constantly for a number of years now and yet…. and yet I still find that our clients:

  • do not want Auto Enrolment
  • do not want to pay the ridiculous set up fees which many providers are charging and
  • do not want to make contributions to their staffs’ pension pots.

 

 

No Choice

However, in short…. you have NO CHOICE. If you employ even one employee, you must provide them with a pension facility and if they do not opt out, you must make contributions to that pension pot. Whether they are the cleaner, the housekeeper, or the admin assistant, whether they are your son, aunt, mum or best friend…. if they are on your payroll and an employee of your business, you must ensure that you have complied with the red tape and bureaucracy.

A word of warning at this point…. If you make them self-employed or contractors to avoid tax and / or pension obligations, there are significant implications with this as well. In some cases ‘workers’ are also entitled to pension contributions.

They want your hard earned cash

The fines for non-compliance are very heavy and may be up to £500 per day. The number of Escalating Penalty Notices issued by HMRC in Q1 of this year is up almost 4 times on the same period last year as an increasing number of small businesses need to comply and are failing to do so. Actual fines issued rose 6 times between March 2015 and 2016.

Check your dates

Since June 2015 employers with less than 30 employees have gradually been required tocalendardate join auto enrolment. The actual staging date is based on the PAYE reference number so employers and their accountants must find out when their actual deadline date is as the implementation period stretches across 2 years. There is a quick guide here, but if you haven’t started to prepare for Auto enrolment, I strongly urge you to do so.

All Change

31 Mar
by Donna Obstfeld, posted in Blog   |  No Comments

Redundancy Pay

No one likes making staff redundant, but sometimes needs must and when the time comes Walking on moneythere is a formal legal process which all employers must follow otherwise the dismissal is automatically unfair. A series of letters must be sent and meetings must be held, even when it is just one employee being made redundant.

As part of this process, there are two primary payments which need to be made to the employee – Notice pay (although the employee can be asked to work their notice) and Redundancy pay.

Redundancy pay is one of the only areas of employment in which age must be taken into consideration as the amount of money an employee is paid is based on their age and their length of service. Each year the Government provides us with a statutory minimum which, providing actual weekly pay is higher than this amount, must be paid for each week of redundancy pay due. This rate increases from 1st April from £475 per week to £479 per week. Not a massive increase I know, but you do need to ensure accurate pay calculations.

 

National Living Wage

The New National Living Wage is coming into effect for employees over the age of 25 on 1st April. All other rates will remain unchanged, but it is essential that you check that you are paying your staff the new rates. There is a download available here for all the annual salaries based on hours worked per week and age. You also need to ensure that you are paying at these levels for holiday and bank holiday entitlements. These need to be properly pro rated for part time employees. If in doubt, give us a call.

Childcare Vouchers

Dad babyIn a recent Employment Appeals Tribunal Case, it was determined that Childcare Vouchers can be stopped during maternity leave. Up until now they have been considered to be a benefit, but as a result of this case they are considered to be pay and therefore can be stopped while an employee is not earning their salary.

Local HR practice DOHR wins not one, but two awards

22 Mar
by Donna Obstfeld, posted in Press Release   |  No Comments

Corporate ExcellenceFollowing their triumphant win as ‘HR Consultancy of the Year’ last year, DOHR has now won a further two awards to add to their collection.

The first is the Corporate Excellence Award for ‘Best for Support Services’. This is awarded by Corporate Vision who state: “When it comes to the business world, true excellence takes many forms. From an unwavering commitment to customer satisfaction and consistently stunning results, to the never-ending quest for innovation and the ability to change, not only a department or business but an entire industry, firms mark themselves out as exceptional in countless ways.”

They go on to say “The 2015 UK Corporate Excellence Awards focus on those firms and individuals across the British Isles, regardless of size, age, specialism or value, that are not just successful – that goes without saying – but undoubtedly and demonstrably special; the people and businesses that define how we view and regard their entire industry and who, taking their place firmly at the forefront of their respective sectors, become a byword for forward-thinking excellence and achievement.”

Building on this winning streak, DOHR has also picked up Corporate Livewires’s ‘Most Outstanding HR Consultancy Firm – UK 2016’. These are global awards with many household names among the winners from 2015. DOHR have been told that they were nominated and selected for the award specifically because of their SME employment legislation compliance product HR in a Box™ as it is not only cost effective, but also innovative, business focussed and practical”.

Understandably DOHR Managing Director, Donna Obstfeld is delighted by these wins. “The awards process is still a bit of a mystery to me, but I am thrilled that we have been nominated and then selected as winners of these two business world awards. To have the recognition last year within our own industry was great, but this just takes it to another level as the business world starts to realise the value that we as an HR practice, are able to add to their business success.”

ENDS


 

DOHR Press Enquiries

Charlotte Mitchell

Tel: 01923 866 034

Email: enquiries@dohr.co.uk

Websites:

www.dohr.co.uk

www.hrinabox.com

Notes for Editors:

  1. Donna Obstfeld is available for interview
  2. DOHR is an HR practice supporting micro, small and medium sized businesses. They are based in Hertfordshire and clients are nationwide.
  3. If you wish to reproduce this article on your website, please link back to the original source dohr.co.uk/2-awards
  4. For more information about the Corporate Vision awards visit http://www.corp-vis.com/awards/2015-uk-excellence-awards/
  5. For more information about the Corporate Livewire awards visit http://www.corporatelivewire.com/awards.html

 

Could you win an employment tribunal case if you needed to?

27 Jan
by Donna Obstfeld, posted in Blog, Contract of employment, Employment Legislation   |  No Comments

Most of our clients are terrified of the thought of ending up in an employment tribunal, not because they have done anything wrong, but because of the hassle, aggravation, time and money it takes to defend the case. Although the UK government have brought in charges in the hope that this would reduce the number of spurious claims, many employees are still able to find a solicitor willing to take on their cases and make something out of not a lot!

With this is mind, I was very interested to read an article this week which provided 5 reasons why companies lose employment tribunals and they are not what you might think!

 

stressed ladyThe first reason that a company may lose a case is because they are not likeable. As with everyone else you meet in life, an employment tribunal chairman is human with their own likes and dislikes. If the facts of the case mean that both the employer and employee could be right, perhaps a case of ‘he says she says’, then the chairman may go with a gut instinct about who is the ‘good guy’ in this struggle.

As the employer, your job (or that of your defence team) is to win over the affections of the judges so that you are perceived to be the good guy. The winning over may actually happen as a result of what has happened in the workplace. If you can demonstrate that you have always tried to be supportive, that you have always had the best intentions and that you have genuinely cared, but the employee has just taken advantage of you and left you no alternatives, then the judges may see you very differently if the behaviour which has led to the tribunal is part of a string of normal, perhaps bullying behaviour.

However, if the winning over needs to be done in the court room:
• Remember your manners
• Don’t argue
• Don’t talk over people
• Show empathy
• Admit any situation, where with the benefit of hindsight you could have done something differently (as long as this does not undermine your case)

 

The second reason identified as likely to lead to losing a case is loss of evidence.

Now this one made me laugh and took me back to October 2004. I was working in a further education college and was helping with an HR department to relocate. There was a locked filing cabinet and nobody could find the key. I refused to move the cabinet into the new, much smaller office space unless we knew what was in it and eventually called facilities and asked them to bring me a crow bar!!!

When the caretakers came up with the crow bar they kindly did the breaking for me and in 3 of the 4 drawers we found all the evidence for a tribunal case which had taken place 2 years earlier and the college had lost because they didn’t know where their evidence was. Seeing the contents of the filing cabinet, one of the HR team said ohhh, that must have been Mrs Jones’ filing cabinet, I think she took the keys with her when she left.

Regardless of the merits of the case, they deserved to lose if they didn’t have the wherewithal to work out where their evidence might be, given that it was in the corner of their office all the time.
Not having the right documentation in place at the time the incident / behaviour happened is the third reason given for employers losing an employment tribunal.

This is a problem that we have identified among our new clients, who tend to come to us once they have a problem and by that time, it is sometimes too late to put the right policies, procedures and practices in place. We find ourselves shutting the stable door after the horse has bolted.

For an employer to have a mandate to manage their business the way they want to, they need to have the right policies and procedures in place which are documented, communicated and complied with. Failure to do this just exposes your business to so much unnecessary risk. This is actually what led us to develop our HR in a Box™ product to enable micro businesses with up to 10 staff to adequately protect themselves.

When you are preparing your case for the employment tribunal, you will need to provide evidence of policies, communication etc in your bundle and it is essential to your defence that you can produce these.

 

The next reason why an employer may lose a tribunal may be down to the quality and preparation of their witnesses.

For anyone, the thought of giving evidence in a court or tribunal can be very daunting, so ensuring that your witnesses are properly prepared, fully understand what they are there to get across and are focussed on their facts is essential. The opposition will try to make things as difficult as possible for your witnesses, will try to undermine their credibility and to confuse them about their story. Your witnesses need to be prepared for this, even to the extent of role play cross examinations prior to the tribunal so that they know how it feels to be aggressively questioned and challenged.

 

Finally, employers need to show passion. You need to show that you truly care about your business, your staff and the situation you have found yourself in. You need to make the time to prepare properly for the case, you need to prioritise the headache of the tribunal at an early stage, so that you create the time and space needed to provide a consistent, passionate and robust case.

So, in summary:
1. Be likable
2. Don’t lose your evidence
3. Make sure policies and procedures are documented now to avoid problems later
4. Make sure your witnesses are adequately prepared and know what to expect
5. Have passion and be consistent

To add a cheeky sixth point here, a lesson from my Scouting Days ……. Be Prepared. A strong case can fall apart if not properly prepared and a weak case could win if enough preparation has gone into it.

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